It can be tough to choose between a TV or projector and screen for your TV viewing area. As we weigh up the pros and cons below, let’s hope we can help you make the right decision for your home. The following critical factors come into play:

Size

When it comes to screens, bigger is almost always better. However, there is a maximum screen size that is recommended for any given room size. This is where a projector is more favourable than a TV, as it can offer much bigger dimensions and a true big-screen experience. It is also much more cost-effective than an 85-inch TV. But if your room doesn’t need a screen bigger than 75 inches, a TV is probably your better bet.

Lighting

TVs are versatile, as they give a consistent image quality and are not adversely affected by the levels of light in the room, although they sometimes can give off a bit of a glare. Some projectors are incredibly sensitive to light conditions. Unless you have complete control of light at any time of the day, through blackout blinds, you will not be able to get great value out of a projector, as you will only be able to fully enjoy the system at night. There are projector screens available that can function in an area where light cannot be managed well, but they may cost slightly more.

Installation

Keep in mind that a TV is a single standalone unit that delivers an entire viewing experience – both video and audio are packaged in one component. A projector solution is a lot more involved and requires some expertise, as you’ll need a projector, a screen and a sound system to match.

Longevity

Projector lamps have a very limited lifespan and, if your projector is used regularly, you will need to replace the lamp every year. The maintenance is the downside of a projector. But the screen itself can be functional for years. TVs don’t require as much love and affection, but can be unaffordable if you look at very large screen sizes.

With thanks to Cinema Architects, Homemation and Simpletech

Featured images supplied by Homemation (left) and iStock (right).

Image: Cinema Architects

Image: Cinema Architects